lesson-indefinite_pronouns

Indefinit Pronouns / Pronombres Indefinidos

Click on the arrow to listen how to pronounce the word in SpanishWhat is a indefinite pronoun?Indefinite pronouns are words that replace nouns; they refer to an identifiable but not specified person or thing, expressing the idea of all, none, any or some.

Nothing / Anything  → Nada   

“Nada” mean nothing and anything. The word can be used in affirmative, negative and interrogative sentences

Examples:

  • Nada és imposible. Nothing is impossible
  • Él no hizo nada. He didn’t do anything.

 

Everything   → Todo   

“Todo means nothing and everything.

Example:

  • Ella sabe todo sobre películas. She knows everything about movies.

More and less   →  Más       y menos   

“Más” means more and “menos” means less. 

Examples

  • Quiero comer más torta. I want to eat more cake.
  • Él está menos preocupado con la situación. He is less worried about the situation

 

Somebody/Anybody and Nobody/No one   →  Alguien       y Nadie   

“Alguien”means somebody and anybody and it is used in both affirmative and interrogative sentences:“Alguien / Nadie” are pronouns used to refer only to people.

Examples:

  • ¿Encontraste alguien en el  parque?  Have you met anybody in the park?
  • İAlguien comió la torta! Somebody ate the cake!

 

“Nadie” means nobody and no one and it is used in negative, affirmative and interrogative sentences

Examples:

  • No he encontrado nadie en el parque. I haven’t met anybody in the park.
  • Nadie comió la torta. Nobody ate the cake.
  • ¿No has encontrado nadie en el parque? Haven’t you met anybody in the park?

 

Some/Any and None  → Alguno      / Algunos      y Ninguno      / Ningún        (masculine)

“Alguno/Algunos” – mean some or any. They are used in both affirmative and interrogative sentences. Before a singular and masculine noun you must use algún

  • Compré algunos libros. I bought some books
  • ¿Compraste algún libro? Did you buy any book?

 “Ninguno/Ningún” – Before a singular and masculine noun you must use ningún. The plural form is rarely used. Those pronouns are used in both negative and affirmative sentences.

  • Yo no compré ningún libro. I haven’t bought any book

 

Some/Any and None →  Alguna      /Algunas      y Ninguna    /Ningunas        (feminine)

“Alguna/Algunas” – mean some and any. They are used in both affirmative and interrogative sentences. “Alguna” is used along with feminine / singular nouns and “algunas” with feminine / plural nouns. Study the examples:

  • Compré algunas flores. I bought some flowers
  • ¿Compraste alguna flor? Did you buy any flower?

 

“Ninguna/Ningunas” The plural form is rarely used. Used in both negative and affirmative sentences.

  • Yo no compré ninguna flor. I haven’t bought any flower

 

So much and so many →  Tanto       / tanta      y tantos      / tantas   

These pronouns must agree in gender and number with the noun they refer to.

Tanto / tanta mean so much. “Tanto” is used along with singular / masculine words and “tanta” with singular / feminine words. Study the examples:

Examples:

  • Él tiene tanto dinero! – He has so much money!
  • Ella cocina tanta comida. She cooks so much food.

 

Tantos / tantas mean so many. “Tantos” is used along with plural / masculine words and “tantas” with plural / feminine words. Study the examples:

Examples:

  • Él tiene tantos amigos. – He has so many friends.
  • Mi madre me ayudó tantas veces – My mother helped me so many times!

 

Few and many →  pocos      / pocas      y muchos      / muchas   

In Spanish, these pronouns must agree in gender and number with the word they’re referring to. They express quantity.

Examples:

Few means pocos / pocas. “Pocos” is used along with plural / masculine words and “pocas” with plural / feminine words. Study the examples:

Examples:

  • Pocos niños fueron al parque. Few boys went to the park.
  • Pocas personas estaban en la fiesta. – Few people were at the party.

 

Many means muchos / muchas. “Muchos” is used along with plural / masculine words and “muchas” with plural / feminine words. Study the examples:

Examples:

  • Muchos niños fueron al parque. – Many students went to the park
  • Muchas personas estaban en la fiesta – Many people were at the party

 

Little and much →  poco     / poca      y mucho      / mucha   

In Spanish, these pronouns must agree in gender and number with the word they’re referring to. They express quantity.

Pouco / Pouca – Little

Little means poco / poca. “Poco” is used along with singular / masculine words and “poca” with singular / feminine words. Study the examples: 

Examples:

  • Él tiene poco dinero. – He has little money.
  • Hay poca comida en la heladera. – There is little food in the refrigerator

 

Much means mucho / mucha. “Mucho” is used along with singular / masculine words and “mucha” with singular / feminine words. Study the examples:

Examples:

  • Él tiene mucho dinero. – He has much money.
  • Hay mucha comida en la heladera. – There is much food in the refrigerator

Too Many →  Demasiados      / demasiadas   

In Spanish, these pronouns must agree in gender and number with the word they’re referring to. They also express quantity.

Too many means demasiados / demasiadas. “Demasiados” is used along with singular / masculine words and “demasiadas” with singular / feminine words. Study the examples:

Examples:

  • Él tiene demasiados libros. – He has too many books.
  • Hay demasiadas personas en la fiesta. – There are too many people at the party.

 

Too Much →  Demasiado       / demasiada   

Too much means demasiado / demasiada. “Demasiado” is used along with singular / masculine words and “demasiada” with singular / feminine words. Study the examples:

Examples:

  • Él tiene demasiado tiempo para terminar su tarea. – He has too much time to finish his homework.
  • Él comió demasiada comida. – He ate too much food.

 

Whole / Entire →  Todo      / Toda      y Todos      / Todas   

When “todo” and “toda” mean “each and every”, is not necessary to use a definite article. It has a literary use.

Example:

  • Toda persona necesita amor. Each and every person needs love.
  • Todo ser-humano es libre. Each and every human being is free.

But when “todo / todos” and “toda / todas” mean “totality”, “entire”, “all”, you do have to use the definite article (el, la) before the noun. Study the examples below and observe that they agree in gender with the noun they accompany.

Examples:

  • (Yo)  estudié todo el día. I studied the entire day
  • Ustedes durmieron toda la tarde? Did you sleep all the afternoon?